Immigrant’s Search for a Better Future

Mexican Immigrant
Mexican Immigrant

Mexican Immigrant

At Trinity Youth Services, our mission is to “help children and families create a better future.” This is the story of Albert,* a foster youth who found his “better future” by becoming an American citizen.

After years of being separated from her son, Albert’s mother paid smugglers, known as “coyotes,” to bring him to the United States from El Salvador, where he had been living with his grandmother. Albert was arrested by immigration officers as he crossed the border and was detained for nearly a month before being released to his mother and her American husband in Los Angeles.

Albert had difficulty adjusting to his new life. His mother and stepfather had a new baby and Albert felt like he didn’t belong. Language issues made school challenging, so Albert stopped attending and fell in with a gang. He had only been in the country seven months before he committed a minor crime, which led to his arrest and confinement in juvenile hall. Albert was arraigned and placed into the care of Trinity Youth Services. His mother then refused to be involved in her son’s life, saying he was “ruining” her new family. At 12 years old, Albert felt his life was over.

Because Albert had no other family in the United States, the judge allowed him to stay in Trinity’s care through the Department of Child and Family Services. Albert spent a total of two years in Trinity’s residential treatment program, working with staff to acquire the knowledge, skills and tools that would prepare him to achieve his lifelong dream of becoming an American citizen. When he was ready, Trinity Team Support Workers, with the volunteer assistance of a paralegal, helped Albert navigate the process, complete the necessary paperwork and even accompanied him to court hearings in an effort to make his dream become a reality.

After becoming a citizen, Albert felt something was still missing from his American dream…

Because approximately 50% of foster children experience some length of homelessness as adults, and knowing that Albert could not return to his family, his Trinity treatment team worked tirelessly to find a resource family to care for him. He met with one potential foster mother, who was retired from the juvenile justice system, and the two immediately connected. Because of her previous occupation, her experience fostering other children and being the child of immigrants herself, she understands the challenges Albert has had to endure. Following their meeting, Albert couldn’t stop talking about her; how nice she was; how much they had in common and how he couldn’t believe she had carpeting all throughout her home! Albert is in the process of being placed with his new resource family.

football

Now 14 years old, Albert is excelling in high school and is making friends. He discovered a love of football, joined the team and won a certificate for “Best Freshmen Defensive Player.” Even though Albert spoke very little English when he came to Trinity, English is now his favorite subject. After high school, he plans to attend college and eventually play pro football.

Only two years after feeling his life was over, Albert is facing a bright future. People around him describe him as a “pleasant” and “focused” young man who always has a smile on his face and loves to make people laugh. Albert is constantly expressing his gratitude for his new “mom,” and for his Trinity “family.” Although his life in the United States is very different than the one he had dreamed of for so long, he still believes dreams do come true – with hard work, opportunity and the support of caring individuals.

At Trinity, we’re here for the good times and bad; to provide focused guidance and therapeutic treatment when needed, and to be a sympathetic listener. We see lives change and dreams come true and we can’t wait to see this young man make a touchdown at his first pro football game!

If you have room in your heart and your home to care for a child like Albert, please submit an inquiry form on our website. For additional information about becoming a foster or adoptive parent, call (888) 346-9645 or email info@trinityys.org.

*Names and details have been omitted or altered to protect the privacy of the child.


Jenelle Rensch

Jenelle Rensch, Marketing and Promotions Specialist
Jenelle maintains a distinctive look and voice for Trinity Youth Services through our online presence, media and community outreach. Before joining the Trinity team in 2016, Jenelle worked in the newspaper/magazine industry for nearly a decade as a graphic designer, photographer, writer and editor. Jenelle earned a bachelor’s degree in visual communications at California State University Fullerton and has won several awards throughout her career including a few from the National Newspaper Association.
Tel: (909) 825-5588 | Email: jrensch@trinityys.org


Happiness

Happiness

The Continuum of Care Reform (CCR) was designed so that children living out of their home would be provided the most appropriate placement in committed nurturing foster homes. Services and supports will be tailored based on each child’s needs. All of these services and supports fall into 6 Core Services: mental health, transition support upon entry, educational/physical/behavioral/extracurricular support, transition to adulthood support, permanency support, and Native American child services.

The Trinity Youth Services (TYS) team, along with our foster/resource families, will directly provide the core services and support to children, Non-minor Dependents (NMD) and their families fulfilling the requirements of CCR.

In this blog, we will outline the first Core Services, Specialty Mental Health Services, and how TYS will provide that service.

Trinity Youth Services is contracted with the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health (LADMH) as well as San Bernardino County Department of Behavioral Health (SBDBH) to provide an array of Specialty Mental Health Services including: Individual/Family Therapy, Collateral Interventions, Medication Support, Therapeutic Behavior Services (TBS), In Home Behavior Support, and Targeted Case Management. These services are delivered by therapists meeting the requirements of each County’s contracts and the California Board of Behavioral Sciences. TYS therapists are trained in Evidence-Based Practices and Outcome Measures designed to meet the needs of the children served.

Assessment

Each child receives a comprehensive assessment upon intake to determine the appropriate course of treatment involving therapy, medication, school, recreation, reunification with family, or transitional housing. Once the assessment is completed, a treatment plan is developed with the Child and Family Team (CFT) to determine goals intended to reduce symptoms, improve behavior, and improve interactions with family and other areas of concern. The primary goal is to return each child to his/her family whenever this is possible and appropriate, to a lower level of placement, or to another permanent placement such as adoption.

mental health

Individual Treatment

Each child who meets medical necessity receives individual therapy on a weekly basis, provided by a highly-qualified therapist. Therapy is conducted in English, or efforts are made to secure staff to assist in providing services in the most comfortable language for the child, along with appropriate cultural competency and humility. Sessions can address a multitude of presenting problems, including those relating to trauma, anger, victimization, substance abuse, and mood disorders (anxiety, depression, etc.). Therapists are able to utilize several Evidence-Based Practices (EBP) that fit the specific challenges of each child, and they will monitor progress with accompanying outcome measures.

Family Therapy and Family Reunification

Family plays a very important role in successful treatment. Every effort is made by the CFT to ensure family contact/participation, including assistance with transportation or language barriers. This will be accomplished under the guidelines of the Core Practice Model through Child Family Team Meetings (CFTM). Family therapy occurs at least monthly or more often as needed.

Evidence-Based Practices

All children are assessed to determine the best course of treatment to address their mental health needs. In addition to the standard therapeutic methods for which clinicians are routinely trained, Trinity offers three other Evidence-Based Practices designed to address a variety of complex mental health issues:

  1. Seeking Safety: Seeking Safety is a trauma informed model focusing on developing alternative functional coping skills. It also addresses topics related to anger management, substance abuse and prevention. Seeking Safety, while used in Individual Therapy as appropriate, is also the group model for Anger Management and Drug Prevention;
  1. Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavior Therapy (TFCBT): TFCBT is an individual, short-term treatment that involves individual and joint sessions with the child and parent. The goal of TFCBT is to help address the bio-psychosocial needs of the child and sharing their trauma narrative with their parents or primary caregivers. Some TYS therapists are similarly trained in Individual Cognitive Behavior Therapy (I-CBT);
  1. Managing and Adapting Practice (MAP): This approach allows the clinicians to adapt treatment to scenarios where children have more than one problem area. This approach uses research studies, tracks progress, and implements multiple interventions best suited to the individual child.

Medication Support

Psychiatric evaluations are initially conducted by a licensed psychiatrist to determine if medications are needed and to provide further diagnostic information to the assessing therapist.  If medications are prescribed, the child attends follow up psychiatric visits at least monthly, or as often as needed as determined by the treating doctor. When medication is not necessary/prescribed, children may continue psychiatric care if referred for specific issues or needs.

Stay tuned for my next blog, which will cover transition support. This topic dives into the important support offered to TYS children as they enter foster care.


Jacqueline Jakob copyJackie Jakob, Foster Care and Adoptions Director
Having over 20 years’ experience, Jackie currently oversees Trinity Youth Services’ operations of foster care and adoptions programs throughout Southern California and in Houston, Texas. She received a bachelor’s degree in law and society from University of California Santa Barbara, a master’s degree in social work from California State University Long Beach and recently became a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Jackie enjoys spending time with her husband and two children attending various baseball, softball and judo meets. She is on the parent board for a judo dojo and is one of the troop leaders for her daughter’s Girl Scout troop. Additionally, she really enjoys running half marathons and aims to run 4 to 5 races each year.
Tel: 909.825.5588 | Email: info@trinityys.org


workspace

CCR

Continuum of Care Reform

California implemented the Continuum of Care Reform (CCR) on January 1, 2017. CCR’s intent is to reduce the use of residential/group home placement settings and to increase the use of family care. The law also intends to decrease the length of time it takes for a child to achieve a permanent home.

Part of CCR includes the new Resource Family Approval process. This changes the way families become resource parents. It requires that “county homes,” relatives and foster family agency homes comply with all the same requirements. Its intent is to ensure all resource families are equipped to provide the best care for the children. It is also intended to streamline the process for approval.

What This Means for Current Foster/Resource Parents

CCR requires that all current certified families to be converted to approved Resource Families.  The process of this conversion will depend on when you were initially certified and whether or not you have adopted a child since your certification. We have until December 31, 2019 to have all families converted. Trinity Youth Services cannot begin converting families until we have approval from Community Care Licensing to do so.

If you have an approved adoption home study.
  • If you were certified after October 1, 2009, you have an adoption home study. In 2009, Los Angeles County required this of all families. You were dually certified, meaning, you’re certification is approved for fostering and adopting. The conversion process for your family will include completing a Conversion of Existing Families: Release of Information form. Your office will provide you the form when we are ready to convert. The plan is to do this around your certification date.
  • If you were certified before January 1, 1999, you will also be required to complete a new Child Abuse Central Index (CACI) check.
If you do not have an approved adoption home study, but have had children placed in your home in 2017.
  • You will be need to fill out a Conversion Resource Family Application.
  • Trinity Youth Services will need to conduct a psychosocial assessment and a Resource Family Written Report for the family. This will entail about three home visits where we interview your family members.
  • If you were certified before January 1, 1999, you will also be required to complete a new Child Abuse Central Index (CACI) check.
If you do not have an approved adoption home study and have not had any children in your care in 2017.
  • All certified homes that do not have any children placed at any time during calendar year 2017 shall forfeit their certificate of approval by operation of law on January 1, 2018. Trinity Youth Services will be required to decertify your home by December 31, 2017.
  • On and after January 1, 2018, if you are interested in providing care again for children you will need to submit an application for Resource Family Approval to Trinity Youth Services and complete the entire Resource Family Approval process.

You will be notified by your office about the process for your family. But if you have any questions, please contact your foster care director or myself.


Jacqueline Jakob copyJackie Jakob, Foster Care and Adoptions Director
Having over 20 years’ experience, Jackie currently oversees Trinity Youth Services’ operations of foster care and adoptions programs throughout Southern California and in Houston, Texas. She received a bachelor’s degree in law and society from University of California Santa Barbara, a master’s degree in social work from California State University Long Beach and recently became a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Jackie enjoys spending time with her husband and two children attending various baseball, softball and judo meets. She is on the parent board for a judo dojo and is one of the troop leaders for her daughter’s Girl Scout troop. Additionally, she really enjoys running half marathons and aims to run 4 to 5 races each year.
Tel: 909.825.5588 | Email: info@trinityys.org


 

UCLA The Den

UCLA

On Wednesday, March 1, HUB International partnered with the Children’s Foundation of America at a UCLA Basketball game to support Trinity Youth Services’ programs. At a time-out during the first half of the sold-out game, HUB took center court at Pauley Pavilion to donate $80,000 aiding important services and experiences for Trinity’s foster youth.

Bruins Cheerleaders

Bob DeValle, of HUB International, presented an oversized check to Trinity Youth Services CEO, John Neiuber. Bruin’s cheerleaders rooted on as the game announcer spoke of the importance of Trinity Youth Services’ programs for foster youth.

HUB International

HUB International not only contributed a generous donation for Trinity’s programs, but also donated tickets to the game and UCLA t-shirts for Trinity foster youth.

“Thank you to Bob DeValle and HUB International for their donation of tickets so the young men in our residential programs could enjoy the Bruins victory over the Washington Huskies 98-66,” said Mr. Neiuber. “HUB’s continuing partnership goes a long way in helping Trinity to provide the safe and secure setting where children can learn to cope and heal from the trauma in their lives.”

UCLA Men's Basketball

HUB International will partner with the Children’s Foundation of America in presenting a charity golf tournament later this year. The annual Trinity Classic golf tournament raises funds to support programs and services that assist children and youth in out-of-home placement to achieve permanency in supportive, loving homes. The tournament will take place on October 23, 2017. Get updates on the upcoming event by signing up for our newsletter at the bottom of this page.

UCLA The Den

Click here to learn more about Trinity Youth Services’ programs.


Jenelle Rensch

Jenelle Rensch, Marketing and Promotions Specialist
Jenelle maintains a distinctive look and voice for Trinity Youth Services through our online presence, media and community outreach. Before joining the Trinity team in 2016, Jenelle worked in the newspaper/magazine industry for nearly a decade as a graphic designer, photographer, writer and editor. Jenelle earned a bachelor’s degree in visual communications at California State University Fullerton and has won several awards throughout her career including a few from the National Newspaper Association.
Tel: (909) 825-5588 | Email: jrensch@trinityys.org


London in London

Former foster youth, London Taylor, is setting out to make a difference in the world. At 19 years of age, London has been accepted into Richmond, The American International University in London where he is studying International Relations.

London in London

Changing Perceptions

It was his time in Trinity Youth Services’ residential program that inspired him to pursue a career in social issues.

“My perceptions were changed in Trinity’s environment when I started to discern the unique circumstances of each individual peer that I came into contact with,” he said.

Describing his experience at Trinity, London stated, “fundamental attribution error is the tendency where humans tend to attribute other humans’ shortcomings and hardships to those individuals themselves, failing to account for any other extenuating circumstances. This stigma is a mechanism used too often by the masses to describe disenfranchised groups like foster teens, homeless individuals and lower income individuals. Trinity’s programs are advantageous for such groups in society,” he said.

While at Trinity, London wrote a book titled “Politik” and later independently published it through Squarespace. Because London’s focus is on assisting the disadvantaged, he intends for all proceeds of the book to be donated to UNICEF.

Since being in Trinity’s programs, London has “a high regard for Trinity’s vocational and independent living skills programs, which are dynamic and relevant,” he said.

College Life

After graduating from Trinity’s residential program, London began looking through a list of colleges. The name Richmond, The American International University in London caught his attention. He began to extensively research the university and became increasingly interested in the school. He decided to apply and was accepted. London was even awarded scholarships, including the Michael Alexander Memorial Scholarship, administered by Trinity.

He began his first semester in fall 2016 and will continue there until the completion of his bachelor’s degree. The International Relations degree prepares students for work in international organizations, business, finance, the media and government agencies. The major requires “articulate, clear thinking individuals with a grasp of contemporary political issues, succinct writing styles, and the ability to present complex arguments.”

London in London

Making Connections

London’s favorite part about studying in such an international city has been making connections relevant to his major. He recently had the opportunity to speak with the former head of a nongovernmental organization which lobbies governments worldwide to uphold the religious freedom rights found in Article 18 of the United Nations Universal Declaration on Human Rights. Through his networking, London hopes to find an internship at one of the many interesting and important organizations making a global difference.

“Here I am in arguably the most global city in the world, studying, working and exploring internship options—it’s a tremendous blessing,” he said.

World View

London is very focused on his studies, but makes sure to set time aside for sightseeing and travel. This is important for developing a world view and gaining international experience. Britain’s close proximity to other nearby European countries makes international travel possible for him. London has already had the opportunity to visit his cousin in Italy, who is studying in Milan.

London in London

Giving Back

Aside from his schoolwork, London is currently volunteering in the administrative offices of a local mental health clinic and hopes to gain more experience with his other passion—Psychology. In addition to majoring in International Relations, London is also minoring in Psychology.

Looking to the future, London aspires to become a diplomat or ambassador for an intergovernmental organization like the United Nations or a nongovernmental organization like CARE International. London also looks forward to authoring more books and wishes to promote peace, human rights and policies to help society worldwide.

For more stories of success, sign up for our newsletter at the bottom of the page. To contact us about Trinity Youth Services programs, call (800) 964-9811 or email info@trinityys.org.


Jenelle Rensch

Jenelle Rensch, Marketing and Promotions Specialist
Jenelle maintains a distinctive look and voice for Trinity Youth Services through our online presence, media and community outreach. Before joining the Trinity team in 2016, Jenelle worked in the newspaper/magazine industry for nearly a decade as a graphic designer, photographer, writer and editor. Jenelle earned a bachelor’s degree in visual communications at California State University Fullerton and has won several awards throughout her career including a few from the National Newspaper Association.
Tel: (909) 825-5588 | Email: jrensch@trinityys.org


Resource Parents

Resource Parents

Children in foster care, who have suffered trauma, require safe, nurturing relationships with resource parents so they can begin to heal. A trauma is any experience that is deeply distressing or disturbing. Traumatic events can take many forms, and the way children and youth experience it can vary as well. With the help of caring and patient resource parents, children who have been traumatized can begin to cope, heal and thrive.

Children in foster care have suffered some form of abuse or neglect. It is important to gather as much history and information about the child from the placing agency or birth parent as possible. Understanding where the child comes from will help in making parenting decisions. Trying to imagine what the child has gone through and how they may have felt, will allow you to understand why they respond the way they do. Any experience, good or bad, will have an impact on a child’s behavior and how they will adjust to their new resource family. Each child is different and will have their own reaction to abuse and neglect, even if they are part of the same family. Understanding this and not taking behavior personally will make parenting a little easier.

 

Identifying Signs of Abuse and Neglect

At times it is difficult to obtain background information about the child, so it’s important as a resource parent to learn to identify signs of abuse and neglect. Below are a few signs of which to be aware. The list is not comprehensive and not all children that have these signs have been abused.

Child AbusePhysical Abuse
-Unexplained bruises, welts or swelling
-Broken bones, burns or bites
-A child cowers when approached by an adult
-Frequent physical complaints, such as stomach aches or headaches

Neglect
-Lacks needed medical or dental care
-Appears underweight
-Eats rapidly or hoards food

Sexual Abuse
-Nightmares or bedwetting
-Knowledge or interest in sexual behaviors that are not age appropriate
-Attaches very quickly to strangers

Emotional Abuse
-Fearful of parent or says they hate their parent
-Talks badly about themselves (“I’m worthless”)
-Shows either inappropriately mature behavior (parenting other children) or inappropriately childish behavior (rocking or head banging)

 

Learning How to Cope

For resource parents, it’s important to keep the social worker aware of behaviors and signs the child is exhibiting. This will help both the resource parent and social worker develop a treatment plan to better serve the needs of the child and help them start the healing process.

Teaching children how to cope with their past abuse will begin to build their resilience and allow them to flourish. The following are some things you can do to help your child’s ability to cope.

Start to Bond
Teach your child that you and your family will be there for them, no matter the situation. Talk to them about building trusting and respectful relationships. Do things as a family. Ask them about their likes and dislikes and incorporate things like favorite foods to your new family’s routine.

Allow Children to Express Their Feelings
Teach your children how to identify their feelings and praise them for expressing them. Show them that it’s okay to express being hurt, angry or sad, without having to act out. Encourage your children to talk about their biological families as well. It will put them at ease and not feel as if they have to choose between the two of you.

Be Consistent
If you say you are going to do something, do it. Show them that they can count on you. Treat everyone in the family the same. This will help to build trust.

Be Patient
Each child is different and will react differently to trauma. Don’t rush a child, they may not be ready to talk about their past. Also, be patient when children act out—it’s not about you, it’s about their trauma.

Be Supportive
Express love, caring and support to your children both verbally and physically. Give them praise, high-fives, hugs or little notes. Let them know that you are there for them.

 

Behavior

Child BehaviorThe healing process takes time and is different for every child. Children in foster care need someone to help them understand the difference between acceptable and unacceptable behavior. We must teach them that behaviors have consequences and to take responsibility for their actions. Some techniques that will assist this process include:

Role Modeling
Show your child how to interact with others. Show them how to express emotions and how to deal with frustration. Stay calm. Be a model for the type of behavior you want to see them display.

Encouragement
Catch your children doing something right, and praise them. When they make a mistake correct them.

Rules
Create a routine. Have rules for bedtimes, play time, meals and homework time. Be consistent with routines and rules. When children know what is going to happen next, they are less anxious.

 

cropped-favicon.pngSupport

Resource parenting is a challenging task, but you are not alone. You are part of a child and family team that are all working together for that child to succeed. Trinity Youth Services offers 24/7 support 365 days a year. For more information, contact us at (800) 964-9811 or info@trinityys.org.

 


Jacqueline Jakob copyJackie Jakob, Foster Care and Adoptions Director
Having over 20 years’ experience, Jackie currently oversees Trinity Youth Services’s operations of foster care and adoptions programs throughout Southern California and in Houston, Texas. She received a bachelor’s degree in law and society from University of California Santa Barbara, a master’s degree in social work from California State University Long Beach and recently became a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Jackie enjoys spending time with her husband and two children attending various baseball, softball and judo meets. She is on the parent board for a judo dojo and is one of the troop leaders for her daughter’s Girl Scout troop. Additionally, she really enjoys running half marathons and aims to run 4 to 5 races each year.
Tel: 909.825.5588 | Email: info@trinityys.org


 

Continuum of Care Reform

Continuum of Care Reform

On January 1, the long-awaited Continuum of Care Reform began throughout California. The Continuum of Care Reform (CCR) effort, which is implemented by Assembly Bill 403, is designed to make sure that youth in foster care have their day-to-day physical, mental and emotional needs met; that they have the greatest chance to grow up in permanent homes; and that they have the opportunity to grow into self-sufficient, successful adults. In other words, the reform effort is attempting to provide for foster children exactly what it is that parents provide their own children.

Resource Family vs. Foster Family:

Families who now provide foster care will be known as resource families and will be provided targeted training and support so that they are better prepared to care for the children living with them. The reform effort also advances California’s long-standing goal to move away from the use of long-term group home care by increasing placements with resource families. Existing group home care will now be transformed into Short-Term Residential Therapeutic Programs (STRTP), where youth who are not ready to live with families can receive short-term, intensive treatment.

The term “continuum of care” refers to the spectrum of care settings for youth in foster care, from the least restrictive and least service-intensive to the most restrictive and most service-intensive. For example, a placement with an individual foster family or an extended family member would be least restrictive, and a placement in a group home with mental health treatment and limits on when the youth could leave the facility would be the most restrictive.

To better meet the needs of children in foster care and to promote positive outcomes, the CCR implements the following:

  • Updates the assessment process so that the first placement is the right one.
  • Establishes core services and supports for foster youth, their families, and resource families;
  • Strengthens training and qualifications for  resource families providing care to foster youth and congregate care facility staff;
  • To the extent that the children are provided needed services and support, transitions children from congregate care into home-based family care with resource families;
  • Transforms group homes into a new category of congregate care facility defined as Short-Term Residential Treatment Programs;
  • Revises the foster care rate structure;
  • Requires STRTPs and treatment foster family agencies to be certified by counties through their mental health plans;
  • Requires foster family agencies and STRTPs to be nationally accredited.
  • Evaluates foster family agency performance measures and outcomes.

What does this mean for the Trinity Foster Family and Adoption Agency and for the foster parents currently certified by the agency?

It means, first and foremost, that the agency and resource parents will be better able to meet the needs of the foster children. Better assessments will mean better matches for children when placed. Resource parents will be better trained to help meet the needs of the children in their care. More services and supports will be available to help children when they experience difficulty. Eventually, the state will implement a new rate structure that will assist agencies and resource parents to provide the proper services and supports to children.

There will be a new Resource Family Approval process:

The good news is that current foster family who were approved before January 1 are certified to provide care. There are only a few current foster parents who are not dually certified for both foster care and adoption, and there is a plan in place to have them certified by state deadlines.  The new Resource Family Approval process has new requirements for training that Trinity will ensure its families receive.

Trinity currently meets all of requirements under the CCR:

Trinity is nationally accredited by the Council on Accreditation and has been since 2014.  Trinity is also mentally health certified in both Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties. Trinity has also submitted its new Program Statement to change its group homes to STRTPs and has also updated and submitted its Program Statement for foster care to the State.  Trinity has for a number of years used evidence based practices and tracks performance measure and outcomes.

Should you have questions about the CCR or resource parent requirements, please contact your local office director or social worker.


John Neiuber copyJohn Neiuber, Chief Executive Officer
John is the chief executive officer of Trinity Youth Services. With programs in two states, he leads an agency that serves over 500 children and families daily through residential treatment services, mental health programs, foster care agency and adoption services. He received both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from California State University, San Bernardino. In 1993, he became the CEO of Advanced Education Services, a not-for-profit corporation that operated nonpublic and charter schools. He became the chief operating officer of Trinity Youth Services in 2002 and CEO in 2005.

Tel: (800) 964-9811 | Email: info@trinityys.org


 

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Trinity Youth Services Adoption

 

20170124-img_8212-webA Joyous Occasion

“This is a joyous occasion,” a Trinity Youth Services adoption social worker said. After being in foster care for almost all of his young life, a 22-month-old baby boy was adopted by the Spivey family with the aid of Trinity Youth Services.

The boy was placed into foster care just days after birth. Ms. Spivey took him into her home as soon as the hospital discharged him. He was only 3 days old and Ms. Spivey immediately felt there was a place in her family for him.

“When I met him, I knew,” she said. “He’s always been such a good little boy.”

Ms. Spivey also has an 18-year-old son and is currently fostering a baby girl, who is expected to be reunited with her birth family soon. Some have told Ms. Spivey she is crazy for once again taking on the role of new mother now that her older son is grown, but her response is that she is “beyond excited.” She said, this baby boy “has always been my son and I’m here to make it legal.”

20170124-img_8236-webTogether

During the adoption finalization, Ms. Spivey was surrounded by the support of representatives from Trinity Youth Services and the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS), as well as her lawyer and members of her immediate and extended family. The entire Spivey family was overjoyed to welcome the child into their lives, so much so, that some relatives flew to Los Angeles to surprise Ms. Spivey by being there in person.

“This was a joint effort getting him here today,” Ms. Spivey said as she thanked everyone for being there.

20170124-img_8122-webDoing Something Right

The family and supporters gathered in the courtroom where the Spivey family’s adoption lawyer made the formal appeal for the adoption and the judge formally granted it. As the room cheered, the baby boy threw his little hat into the air, smiling and giggling. The judge laughed and commented that Ms. Spivey “must be doing something right.”

If you are moved to “do something right” for a child in need of a “Forever Family” and are interested in becoming a foster or adoptive parent like Ms. Spivey, contact Trinity Youth Services today to begin your journey: 888.346.9645 or info@trinityys.org.

*Names have been omitted to protect our clients’ privacy.

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Congratulations to the Spivey family! From all of us at Trinity Youth Services.


Jenelle Rensch

Jenelle Rensch, Marketing and Promotions Specialist
Jenelle maintains a distinctive look and voice for Trinity Youth Services through our online presence, media and community outreach. Before joining the Trinity team in 2016, Jenelle worked in the newspaper/magazine industry for nearly a decade as a graphic designer, photographer, writer and editor. Jenelle earned a bachelor’s degree in visual communications at California State University Fullerton and has won several awards throughout her career including a few from the National Newspaper Association.
Tel: 909.825.5588 | Email: jrensch@trinityys.org


Foster Care

Adoption

Considering Foster Care and Adoption

Jake and Kendra are a young couple who desired to have a family of their own. Although they were not able to achieve this goal through traditional means, they had the faith to believe that these dreams would become a reality through foster care and adoption.

Making the First Step

They felt it was divine intervention that their very first placement would turn their lives upside down in such a joyous way. Their first foster placement was a happy little boy that allowed the couple to express love that stretched beyond bloodline. The family loved the child with all that was in them, despite the risk of breaking their own heart should family reunification occur. Their love and bond for this young boy was witnessed by social workers, family and friends. He looked to Jake and Kendra with such passion and they returned this affection.

After a time, the family accepted placement for another infant, a joyful baby girl. Although they didn’t think that their hearts could expand any further, this young child was grafted into their heart and they welcomed her and loved her with the same intensity, again, at the risk of breaking their own hearts.

Jake and Kendra sought the assistance of foster care to allow them the opportunity to expand their family and give them the chance to love a child—either until they returned home or until they could make them part of their forever family. To see them interact with the children, it is clear that their hearts were filled with love as they shared smiles, wisdom, hugs, warmth and security to the children in their care.  Foster care has allowed them the ability to change and transform the lives of these two beautiful, loving children.

Forming a Family

Trinity Youth Services is pleased to report that there is a pending adoption hearing intended to forever link this family together. We celebrate with this family and honor them for their commitment to provide love and compassion to the children in their care. We thank them for their willingness to allow us to be part of the journey, as we look forward to celebrating their adoption story. Thank you Jake and Kendra for demonstrating that love is always worth putting your heart on the line.

*Names have been changed to protect the privacy of our clients.

1966

Since 1966, Trinity Youth Services has been helping children and families create a better future. Join us in a photo timeline through the history of Trinity. The organization was established 50 years ago, served over 60,000 children and has grown into the thriving services it has become today encompassing foster care, residential treatment and mental health programs.

1966

1983

19982004
20102011
20142015
2016

2016

 

Accreditation & Affiliations