Core Services: Indian Child Services

Indian Child Services
Indian Child Services

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The Continuum of Care Reform (CCR) was designed so that children living out of their home would be provided the most appropriate placement in committed nurturing resource (foster) homes. Services and supports will be tailored based on each child’s needs. All of these services and supports fall into 6 Core Services: mental health, transition support upon entry, educational/physical/behavioral/extracurricular support, transition to adulthood support, permanency support, and Indian child services.

The Trinity Youth Services (TYS) team, along with our resource (foster) families, will directly provide the core services and support to children, Non-Minor Dependents (NMD) and their families, fulfilling the requirements of the CCR.

Previously we outlined the fifth Core Service, Permanency Support Services. This month we will look at Indian Child Services.

When serving Native American children, Trinity Youth Services will ensure they receive all the core services and support in accordance to the Federal Indian Child Welfare Act.

These services will be in the best interest of the children including culturally appropriate, child-centered practices that respect Native American history, culture, retention of tribal membership, and connection to the tribal community and traditions. Trinity Youth Services resource parents are trained to participate in cultural activities with all children on a monthly basis.

This concludes our series on Core Services. Check back next time when we discuss Child Abuse Prevention Month.


Jacqueline Jakob copyJackie Jakob, Foster Care and Adoptions Director
Having over 20 years’ experience, Jackie currently oversees Trinity Youth Services’ operations of foster care and adoptions programs throughout Southern California and in Houston, Texas. She received a bachelor’s degree in law and society from University of California Santa Barbara, a master’s degree in social work from California State University Long Beach and recently became a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Jackie enjoys spending time with her husband and two children attending various baseball, softball and judo meets. She is on the parent board for a judo dojo and is one of the troop leaders for her daughter’s Girl Scout troop. Additionally, she really enjoys running half marathons and aims to run 4 to 5 races each year.
Tel: 909.825.5588 | Email: info@trinityys.org

Child Family Meeting

Child Family Meeting

It takes a village, as the saying goes…or a group of impassioned people, as Trinity Youth Services likes to put it. Child and Family Team Meetings are a part of every foster child’s case and are mandated by the State of California as part of the Core Practice Model.

Child and Family Team Meetings are group meetings in which life-decisions about a foster child are discussed and made. These meetings are attended by the foster child, and typically their resource parent, their Trinity social worker, county social worker, family and community members, and service providers. There, foster children get a voice and a choice in the things that matter to them. These meetings are held with the idea that families and children are experts on themselves and have the ability to address their problems and achieve success in a strengths-based setting.

Trinity Youth Services firmly believes in each child having the ability to safely and genuinely express their needs and we are in full support of Child and Family Team Meetings. We believe it is vital to the health of a foster child and their family that their preferences are heard and are part of the decision-making process.

To learn more about our programs, click here and keep an eye out for our upcoming blog posts.


Jacqueline Jakob copyJackie Jakob, Foster Care and Adoptions Director
Having over 20 years’ experience, Jackie currently oversees Trinity Youth Services’ operations of foster care and adoptions programs throughout Southern California and in Houston, Texas. She received a bachelor’s degree in law and society from University of California Santa Barbara, a master’s degree in social work from California State University Long Beach and recently became a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Jackie enjoys spending time with her husband and two children attending various baseball, softball and judo meets. She is on the parent board for a judo dojo and is one of the troop leaders for her daughter’s Girl Scout troop. Additionally, she really enjoys running half marathons and aims to run 4 to 5 races each year.
Tel: 909.825.5588 | Email: info@trinityys.org

Foster Level of Care

Foster Level of Care

One thing in life we can be certain of is change. Trinity Youth Services constantly adjusts to changes in policy and adapts to the needs of families served.

The State of California has implemented a new resource family compensation system for caring for foster youth. It is called the Level of Care (LOC) Rate Protocol and the adjustment departs from the age-based rate, to a strengths-based approach which supports a rate for caregivers.

LOC is a State of California legislative mandate that aims to improve and standardize home-based family care (HBFC) rate structures and fully align with Continuum of Care Reform (CCR). It is a strength-based methodology designed to identify the individual care and supervision needs of a child. All placements will be impacted by this new rate structure which is comprised of five core domains spanning across five levels of care.

The Core Domains:

  • Physical
  • Behavioral/Emotional
  • Education
  • Health
  • Permanency/Family Services

The Physical Domain are activities designed to meet the child’s individual daily living needs. The Behavioral/Emotional Domain are activities that promote resilience and well-being and encourage pro-social behavior. The Educational Domain are activities that foster student achievement and educational success. The Health Domain are activities that promote the child’s physical health. The Permanency/Family Services Domain are activities that promote visitation with the birth family, communication, identification and maintenance of life long connections with either biological connections or non-biological connections.

Partial implementation began on December 1, 2017 and the next phase begins March 1, 2018. Trinity Youth Services continually keeps families informed on changes that are important to their success. Look for more news to come about LOC as its full implementation nears.


Jacqueline Jakob copyJackie Jakob, Foster Care and Adoptions Director
Having over 20 years’ experience, Jackie currently oversees Trinity Youth Services’ operations of foster care and adoptions programs throughout Southern California and in Houston, Texas. She received a bachelor’s degree in law and society from University of California Santa Barbara, a master’s degree in social work from California State University Long Beach and recently became a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Jackie enjoys spending time with her husband and two children attending various baseball, softball and judo meets. She is on the parent board for a judo dojo and is one of the troop leaders for her daughter’s Girl Scout troop. Additionally, she really enjoys running half marathons and aims to run 4 to 5 races each year.
Tel: 909.825.5588 | Email: info@trinityys.org

rancho-cucamonga-open-house

rancho-cucamonga-open-house

On November 30, Trinity Youth Services in Rancho Cucamonga opened its doors to community members in their new location. “Our goal is to educate and inform the public about foster care as well as give support to families caring for children,” said Director Laura Kassem. “This is an opportunity for the local community to learn more about us and the services we provide.”

At the Rancho Cucamonga, CA office, 13 staff members guide resource parents through the process of creating a stable home for children. One resource parent, a retired woman caring for three foster children under the age of 5, described her experience with Trinity Youth Services. “I receive everything I need to provide these children with a happy and whole life. This lets me concentrate on the joy that they give me and how to give them what they need in a stable family environment.”

What Trinity Youth Services Provides

During their time with Trinity Youth Services, children are matched with resource parents along with all of the services they need for mental, physical and emotional well-being. Trinity Youth Services centralizes support services to ensure a smooth transition for parents and children by providing:

  • Professional guidance on how to best care for foster children.
  • A safe, staff-monitored space for children to meet with biological family members.
  • Treatment services for children from licensed social workers and therapists to heal from emotional and psychological issues that arise due to trauma.
  • Training and support for resource parents to prepare for home-based family care.
  • Intensive support and training for resource parents who care for children with complex emotional and behavioral issues.
  • A child and family team including child, resource parents, social workers, psychiatrist and other experienced staff members to develop the best plan for each child’s future.

All Trinity Youth Services locations feature one-on-one information sessions for potential resource parents and support throughout the entire certification process.

To learn more about becoming a resource parent or schedule a one-on-one information session with Trinity Youth Services, click here.


Trinity Youth Services Kelly BaumannKelly BaumannAmeriCorps VIP Fellow
Kelly specializes in creating and optimizing digital content for the Trinity Youth Services blog. She has ten years of experience as a marketer and has held a variety of positions including content writer, social media coordinator, public relations executive and content strategist. At Trinity Youth Services, Kelly focuses on sharing stories and information to educate the public about foster care, adoption and the programs that Trinity Youth Services provides.
Tel: (909)426-0773 | Email: kbaumann@trinityys.org

Monterey Park

Monterey Park

Trinity Youth Services recently merged all Los Angeles County foster care and adoption offices into one centralized location in Monterey Park. This new location allows Trinity to better access all the families we serve.

Though there were some minor changes, most families were able to keep their assigned social worker. It is important to the agency to maintain the relationships between social workers and families, respecting the level of trust that has been developed over the time with the agency.

Monterey Park

Consolidating the West Covina, Palmdale and Long Beach offices to the one, centralized Monterey Park location reduces expenses and overhead, which in turn allows us to better serve the families and children in our care.

On August 23, the Monterey Park Foster Care and Adoptions Office hosted an open house so that the community and resource families could see the new office. Resource parents met with staff and other families and had the opportunity to share their own inspiring stories. Snacks and juice were provided to guests as they mixed and mingled in the new office.

Monterey Park

“The new office will accommodate not only the growth of the agency, but the addition of mental health services as well,” said Foster Care and Adoptions Director Jackie Jakob.

Trinity Youth Services is so excited to expand our capacity and reach more families looking to create a better future for children in need.

Monterey Park

Interested in becoming a foster or adoptive parent? Call 888-346-9645 or fill out our inquiry form to get started.


Jenelle Rensch

Jenelle RenschMarketing & Promotions Specialist
Jenelle maintains a distinctive look and voice for Trinity Youth Services through our online presence, media and community outreach. Before joining the Trinity team in 2016, Jenelle worked in the newspaper/magazine industry for nearly a decade as a graphic designer, photographer, writer and editor. Jenelle earned a bachelor’s degree in visual communications at California State University Fullerton and has won several awards throughout her career including a few from the National Newspaper Association.
Tel: (909) 825-5588 | Email: jrensch@trinityys.org


Trinity El Monte

Trinity El Monte

Author, marine biologist and conservationist Rachel Carson wrote that “Play, incorporating animistic and magical thinking is important because it: Fosters the healthy, creative and emotional growth of a child; Forms the best foundation for later intellectual growth; Provides a way in which children get to know the world and creates possibilities for different ways of responding to it; and Fosters empathy and wonder.”

For youth in foster care, such fundamental development opportunities are difficult to make reality. Furthermore, obtaining a sense of normalcy for a child living on a residential campus certainly has its challenges. Thanks to the support of community partners, children at Trinity Youth Services get a chance to learn basic social skills by going out to eat at a restaurant, team building skills though participation in sports, and opportunities to interact in nature to engage and inspire.

Nonprofit organization, Friends of Foster Children San Gabriel Valley (FOFC), recently donated to Trinity’s El Monte residential campus. The organization was established in 1976 to enhance the quality of life for abused, abandoned and neglected children in the San Gabriel Valley. The organization’s Foster Caring Committee approved a budget to provide 6 residential campuses in the area with spring and summer opportunities and experiences.

“The purpose of the Foster Caring Committee is to provide a resource to these facilities for immediate needs and for us to respond quickly. The facilities present their requests to their appointed liaison prior to each Committee meeting.  The Committee may award funds for cottage enhancements, recreational equipment, holiday parties, graduation expenses, craft supplies, and many more. Foster Caring has a limited budget and we stretch it as far and as fairly as possible at each meeting. We base our decisions on the type of request, the dollar amount and the urgency,” said Carole Kolla of the FOFC Foster Caring Committee.

The Foster Caring Committee chose to fulfill many of the boy’s requests at the Trinity El Monte residential campus including 6 skateboards and pads, 5 video games, 11 DVDs, 5 volleyballs, 4 basketballs and 1 hacky sack. The committee also provided new basketball shorts and swim trunks for their outdoor activities.

The donation also included some off campus activities. Youth in foster care face many challenges as they strive to just feel like a “normal” kid. Clearances and supervision must be in place and youth living on a residential campus can feel cooped up. This is why it is so important for them to have real life experiences off campus and to learn to develop in the area of social interactions. Thanks to FOFC, the youth were able to experience either a Dodger game, a Shakey’s buffet, or a day at Speed Zone this summer.

One group of boys went on “a trip to a favorite restaurant for dinner and an etiquette class, [which is] exciting for the boys who have earned a special off-campus outing,” the FOFC newsletter said. “The youth were given guidance on dressing nicely, how to order, table manners, party smarts, and showing kindness,” said Trinity El Monte Recreation Supervisor, Cathleen Duran.

“I admire Cathleen’s great love and support for the boys on campus and her dedication to Trinity El Monte. She is a pleasure to work with,” Carole said.

garden-el-monte

A surprising item on the boy’s wish list was gardening supplies. They chose a variety of plants and flowers to grow and have been diligent to keep the small garden prospering. “The good news is that the plants are still alive and flowering. Good job boys!” read the FOFC newsletter.

A big thank you to Friends of Foster Children San Gabriel Valley for their generosity in helping provide group enrichment activities, skill building opportunities and social outings during the spring and summer. These experiences are cherished by Trinity youth and staff as we work together with our community partners to bring a sense of normalcy to the lives of youth in foster care. These essential development opportunities truly make a difference as the youth learn to cope with and heal from the trauma in their lives. Trinity strives to be the #1 choice in providing quality care for children and their families, with one goal in mind: permanency for children and families so they can create a better future.

For more information regarding Trinity Youth Services programs, call 800-964-9811 or email info@trinityys.org.


Jenelle Rensch

Jenelle RenschMarketing & Promotions Specialist
Jenelle maintains a distinctive look and voice for Trinity Youth Services through our online presence, media and community outreach. Before joining the Trinity team in 2016, Jenelle worked in the newspaper/magazine industry for nearly a decade as a graphic designer, photographer, writer and editor. Jenelle earned a bachelor’s degree in visual communications at California State University Fullerton and has won several awards throughout her career including a few from the National Newspaper Association.
Tel: (909) 825-5588 | Email: jrensch@trinityys.org


Officially Fullers
Fuller Adoption
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Jack and Kendrena Fuller didn’t lose hope when their doctor told them they couldn’t have children. The couple, who live in Redlands, CA, decided to do something positive with their circumstances. In 2015, the Fullers decided to become foster parents.

Jackson was placed with them first, a hands-on, smart child who continues to wow the Fullers with his ability to be a fast learner. Then came Elyn, a smiley girl whose joy is to make others smile. Both were just a few weeks old when they came into Jack and Kendrena’s lives. Jackson, now 2, and Elyn, just a little over a year old, are officially Fullers.

“There was a hole for us and they filled it,” Jack said. Kendrena added that she would encourage others to foster-adopt. “It’s an amazing experience and a fulfilling feeling,” she said.

Officially Fullers

The whole family was present on the day of the adoption hearing and has been supportive of Jack and Kendrena’s foster-adopt journey from the beginning. “They love the children as much as we do,” Jack said. Family members towed balloons, signs and toys for the children, celebrating and cheering on the growing family.

The day was an exciting one for the Fullers. Kendrena described it as “amazing” and Jack said it was also a relief to officially be the children’s parents. However, the Fuller’s story doesn’t end here. Jack and Kendrena are in the process of adopting Jackson’s biological little sister who is just four months old. “They called us from the hospital. We had about five minutes to decide and we went for it,” Kendrena said. “We’re so glad, she’s a sweet girl.”

Watch for our next blog on the Fuller family as we continue the journey from foster care to adoption. If you are interested in becoming a foster or adoptive parent, call us at 888-346-9645 or email info@trinityys.org. You also may begin the process right now by filling out an inquiry form by clicking here.


Jenelle Rensch

Jenelle RenschMarketing and Promotions Specialist
Jenelle maintains a distinctive look and voice for Trinity Youth Services through our online presence, media and community outreach. Before joining the Trinity team in 2016, Jenelle worked in the newspaper/magazine industry for nearly a decade as a graphic designer, photographer, writer and editor. Jenelle earned a bachelor’s degree in visual communications at California State University Fullerton and has won several awards throughout her career including a few from the National Newspaper Association.
Tel: (909) 825-5588 | Email: jrensch@trinityys.org


core services

education core services

The Continuum of Care Reform (CCR) was designed so that children living out of their home would be provided the most appropriate placement in committed nurturing resource (foster) homes. Services and supports will be tailored based on each child’s needs. All of these services and supports fall into 6 Core Services: mental health, transition support upon entry, educational/physical/behavioral/extracurricular support, transition to adulthood support, permanency support, and Native American child services.

The Trinity Youth Services (TYS) team, along with our resource (foster) families, will directly provide the core services and support to children, Non-minor Dependents (NMD) and their families, fulfilling the requirements of the CCR.

Last month we outlined the second core services, transition support services and what that entails. This month we will look at educational, physical, behavioral, and extracurricular support. This core service covers a wide range of items that will help each child feel more “normal” in foster care.

core services

Educational

TYS will ensure that resource parents enroll school-aged children within three school days. The Treatment Foster Care Social Worker (TFCSW) will assist the resource parent if the school does not enroll the child immediately. TYS will ensure that children have access to the same academic resources as other students. TYS will ensure that if a child is struggling in school, the TFCSW along with the Child and Family Team will request that the school hold a Student Study Team (SST) meeting and/or an assessment for an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). The TFCSW will ensure that tutoring services are received, if needed. The TFCSW will assist youth in vocational and/or college preparatory tasks. The TFCSW will ensure that children and youth are receiving life skills training by the resource parents.

Physical, Behavioral, & Mental Health

The TFCSW will ensure that resource parents obtain all medical, dental, behavioral, and mental health services that the child needs with set time frames. The TFCSW will ensure that all children and youth have support and advocacy with respect to prompt and culturally sensitive interventions when being bullied for any reason, such as physical characteristics, foster care status, sexual orientation/gender identity expression (SOGIE), race/ethnicity, or age. Resource parents and the TFCSW are to work closely together to serve the needs of the children. Whenever there is a concern or question the resource parent should be notifying their assigned TFCSW.

Extracurricular

Part of normalizing the children’s experience in foster care is to get them involved in activities or groups either at school or in the community. Schools have a variety of clubs children can join—choir, art club, or sports. In the community, there are various recreational activities—swimming, baseball, softball, or Girl or Boy Scouts. Resource parent must include the children in making the choice of what type of activity interests them. Being involved in such activities helps the children feel connected to other people and make friends with other children with similar interests. Many communities offer short classes through their parks and recreation departments, this is an inexpensive way to expose your children to a variety of activities.

My next blog will cover transition to adulthood support. This topic dives into the important support offered to TYS youth as they obtain independence.


Jacqueline Jakob copyJackie Jakob, Foster Care and Adoptions Director
Having over 20 years’ experience, Jackie currently oversees Trinity Youth Services’ operations of foster care and adoptions programs throughout Southern California and in Houston, Texas. She received a bachelor’s degree in law and society from University of California Santa Barbara, a master’s degree in social work from California State University Long Beach and recently became a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Jackie enjoys spending time with her husband and two children attending various baseball, softball and judo meets. She is on the parent board for a judo dojo and is one of the troop leaders for her daughter’s Girl Scout troop. Additionally, she really enjoys running half marathons and aims to run 4 to 5 races each year.
Tel: 909.825.5588 | Email: info@trinityys.org


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Ka’Tai’Lin (5), Q’iyonna (7) and Ke’ontae (9) spent over 4 years in adoptive foster care. Finally on June 8, 2017, the children found their forever family.

Tesia Weaver became a foster parent because she believed it “needed to be done. There are so many children in the world who need help. It just needed to be done,” she said. She began by fostering Q’iyonna.

Tesia saw Q’iyonna’s brother waiting for her after school, “They hugged and I knew they needed to be together,” she said. She contacted their social worker and asked what it would take to keep them together. Tesia was informed that Q’iyonna didn’t have just one brother, but two and in order to keep them together, Tesia was asked if she would consider adopting.

She knew the children not only needed each other, but they needed her in order to keep them together. She rose to the occasion and decided to adopt all three children. When they heard they would be reunited, “they were so excited,” Tesia said. “Q’iyonna was very excited when she heard her brothers were coming to live with us.”

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On the day of the adoption, Tesia explained she was feeling a multitude of emotions, including “excited and overwhelmed,” she said. “It has been a long time coming. We’re finally here! We’re all excited and happy to be here.” There have been challenges along the way including helping the children understand the steps that must be taken and comforting them with reassurance that they do in fact have a family.

Tesia has found it a challenge “explaining to the children it’s almost here, when it takes a few years. It’s a process,” she said. Ke’ontae was teased at school for being a foster child, but Tesia made sure to reinforce to him that he is part of a family and has a loving home.

Throughout the process, Tesia had the support of her mother, two young adult children and her church. The family has utilized counseling provided by their church and their pastor, Dwayne Jones, has stepped up to be a positive and supportive influence in the children’s lives. The children help at the church with small tasks and Pastor Jones recently taught Ke’ontae how to play the drums.

Their pastor attended the adoption for moral support and commented that he is “happy for them. They have been looking forward to this for a long time.”

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As they waited for their hearing, the children stood out from others, playing with math flash cards, quietly reading, and reading to each other. “The children are very smart,” Pastor Jones said.

Tesia’s mother began looking through photos on her phone of the children since the time they were placed with the family. She reminisced, shared stories and giggled at the sweet things the children had done and all the things they have accomplished as a family leading up to this day. During the hearing, the children’s new “official” grandma was so moved with emotion that, at the end, in tears, she embraced the children.

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Tesia looked proud of her growing family as she sat down with the children at the judge’s podium, asking the boys to kindly “sit up straight, please,” to which the children promptly complied, remembering their manners.

To anyone considering adopting or foster parenting, Tesia says, “go for it. There is a feeling of completion for all and the children no longer feel abandoned.”

If you are interested in fostering or adopting like Tesia, call 888-346-9645 or email info@trinityys.org today.


Jenelle Rensch

Jenelle Rensch, Marketing and Promotions Specialist
Jenelle maintains a distinctive look and voice for Trinity Youth Services through our online presence, media and community outreach. Before joining the Trinity team in 2016, Jenelle worked in the newspaper/magazine industry for nearly a decade as a graphic designer, photographer, writer and editor. Jenelle earned a bachelor’s degree in visual communications at California State University Fullerton and has won several awards throughout her career including a few from the National Newspaper Association.
Tel: (909) 825-5588 | Email: jrensch@trinityys.org


photography by adrian ramirez

photography by adrian ramirez
Photography by Adrian Ramirez

Adrian Ramirez came from deep trauma and a broken family when he was placed into a residential treatment program at Trinity Youth Services. Every day at home was a struggle, drowning in “arguments, threats and everything in between,” Adrian described.

“I spent most of my time keeping busy with school and friends. I only came home to sleep and woke up the next morning to drive myself to school,” he said.

Despite the trauma in his life, Adrian was always a good student and wished more than anything to be able to focus on his schoolwork. In high school, he enjoyed English and has even written novels, which he hopes to one day publish. His favorite activity was getting involved with after school clubs and volunteering.

His single mother struggled to keep the pieces of the family together and tensions continued to build. From the age of 12, Adrian battled with Bipolar Disorder. “My family saw me as unstable and out of control. Truth is, I was. I went from a sweet little kid to a spawn from the ‘underworld’ without notice. My depression was the worst,” he said. During his “low phases,” Adrian experienced a negative interaction with a family member, which would later result in his placement at Trinity Youth Services.

photography by adrian ramirez
Photography by Adrian Ramirez

Right away the staff at Trinity recognized that he was extremely goal oriented, motivated and driven. “He was very helpful in the dorm, doing extra chores, encouraging the other youth to participate in decorating and celebrating holidays,” his supervisor, Janet Sutton, said. “He actually started a tradition in the dorm for Secret Santa. I thought it was an excellent suggestion and is something we plan to keep doing.”

Adrian attributes his success in Trinity’s program to the staff. “They put in a group effort to get me through the program and I would get some great advice from them,” he said. “I always had someone to go to.”

“Completing the program changed my life,” Adrian said. “The main thing I learned from being at Trinity is to first of all, take advantage of the blessings and opportunities given to you and to be incredibly grateful for those opportunities.”

Adrian says he learned accountability and how to self-analyze to correct the behaviors he began in his childhood. “One of the challenges he faced was learning about himself, what he valued and where his morals were,” his supervisor said.

photography by adrian ramirez
Photography by Adrian Ramirez

Four months ago, Adrian graduated from Trinity’s program just after his 19th birthday. He is currently in college studying physiology/biology and business administration. “He has some incredible goals for himself and was always a motivated student, who really paid attention to his academics,” his supervisor said.

Among Adrian’s many skills, he also has a love for photography. He began this interest in high school and is self-taught. “I got a camera one year for my birthday and I took it everywhere. Photography taught me patience, timing and appreciation for the smallest and sometimes the seemingly most insignificant things,” he said. He also taught himself how to use Photoshop and other software. Now a 4.0 GPA college student, he is taking photography courses and business classes to learn how to turn his hobby into an entrepreneurial venture.

However, his main focus of study is medicine. Adrian plans to transfer to a four-year university where he will discover how to develop this passion into a career. Perhaps it is the time he has spent looking after his grandmother, taking her to doctor appointments, which lead him to pursue an interest in the medical field. “I am still undecided in what particular field, but it will be in medical, perhaps become a specialty doctor,” he said.

photography by adrian ramirez
Photography by Adrian Ramirez

Despite the unstable experiences of his past, with the help of Trinity Youth Services, he has learned how to cope and deal with the challenges he is presented and is more likely to take responsibility in a situation. He currently lives with his mom and grandmother and gladly takes the initiative to assist his family with household tasks like cooking and cleaning.

“I now spend my time doing school work, practicing my ukulele, working on my photography business plan, keeping healthy, going to the gym and spending time with friends and family,” he said.

Adrian believes “we are all dealt cards, some worse than others. It’s not about the cards. It’s about how you deal with them. A person’s greatest tool is the ability to learn from their experiences,” he said. “The only person standing between you and success is yourself.”

To learn more about Trinity Youth Services programs, call (800) 964-9811 or email info@trinityys.org.


Jenelle Rensch

Jenelle Rensch, Marketing and Promotions Specialist
Jenelle maintains a distinctive look and voice for Trinity Youth Services through our online presence, media and community outreach. Before joining the Trinity team in 2016, Jenelle worked in the newspaper/magazine industry for nearly a decade as a graphic designer, photographer, writer and editor. Jenelle earned a bachelor’s degree in visual communications at California State University Fullerton and has won several awards throughout her career including a few from the National Newspaper Association.
Tel: (909) 825-5588 | Email: jrensch@trinityys.org


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