Transforming Trauma-Affected Children Through Love: Rosa’s Journey as a Foster Parent

foster grandparents

Rosa’s unconditional love for children and passion for helping them succeed, led her to become a foster parent. Fostering since 2004, Rosa’s dream of caring for children in crisis has not always been easy. She has helped raise several children for over a decade, but the rewards have far surpassed the challenges she has faced on her journey.

According to Rosa, “Seeing the change in the kids, teaching them respect, and seeing the difference it makes, makes us feel good. I currently have three girls and one boy, but I’ve had over 180 children. They come from broken homes, but we give them stability. Having a lot of love, understanding and patience is important. The kids change when they see you work with them.”

Raising abused, neglected and abandoned children and teaching them to become empowered, resilient and successful is Rosa’s mission. Juggling a busy schedule, Rosa takes time to not only provide children with love and support, but also helps them thrive scholastically. According to Rosa, “Most of my kids get recognized in school. One child, who we thought had a learning disability, didn’t know how to read. We helped him learn how to read and do math problems, and he received an award. When you want to [help], there is always a way.”

Since his retirement, Rosa’s husband has taken an active role in helping her care for the children. Happy to help make a difference in the lives of children and their families, Rosa plans to continue to open her home to children who need it most. She especially feels a sense of accomplishment when children go back with their families.

“It’s good to see parents do what they need to do so that the child goes back to them. It’s all about reunification. It’s all about loving the kids and wanting to help them,” Rosa says.

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florence-1Florence EdwardsFoster Care Marketing Specialist
Florence has a strong commitment to helping foster youth and their families thrive and live successful lives. A former foster youth, Florence obtained her bachelor’s and master’s degree in Communications from California State University, San Bernardino, and is a certified Holistic Life Coach, motivational writer, self-help author and celebrity interviewer. Beyond the Trinity Youth Services blog, Florence’s articles can be found in numerous platforms including Foster Focus Magazine, Heart & Soul Magazine, BET Centric and Huffington Post. A passionate advocate for the LGBTQ community, Florence continues to educate, support and mentor foster youth throughout Southern California. Email: fedwards@trinityys.org | Phone: 888.346-9645

Young hipster father, mother and cute baby boy sitting on rustic wooden floor over white background

To celebrate National Foster Care Month, Trinity Youth Services is shining the spotlight on some of our foster parents who give hope, love and support to children in need. We realize that having a kind, compassionate family is critical for a child in crisis to feel safe in the world. Through our commitment to providing excellent families and homes to children in need, we hope to inspire people with caring hearts to foster this future generation of adults to help them live healthy and successful lives.

For this year’s National Foster Care Month, we proudly honor the efforts of hardworking, passionate people in our nation’s past who dedicated their lives to serving disadvantaged children. Here is a brief history of National Foster Care Month:

1636

Seven-year-old Benjamin Eaton became the first foster child in the U.S.

1853

Minister and director of the New York Children’s Aid Society, Charles Loring Brace started the free foster home movement after witnessing immigrant children in New York sleeping in the streets. He encouraged families to provide free housing to homeless children. His passion for helping homeless children ignited the foster care movement as we know it today.

1972

President Nixon declared National Action for Foster Children Week to shed light on foster children’s needs and to recruit more foster parents.

1988

President Reagan established May as National Foster Care Month.

Since opening our doors in 1966, Trinity Youth Services continues to enhance the lives of children devastated by physical, mental and emotional trauma. Our inspiring foster parents help heal the hearts and souls of children from broken homes and gives them an opportunity to experience parental love.

Coming up next…

Stay tuned to read Waridi Heard’s inspiring message of hope, and how becoming a foster parent transformed her life!

 

 

Child Family Meeting

It takes a village, as the saying goes…or a group of impassioned people, as Trinity Youth Services likes to put it. Child and Family Team Meetings are a part of every foster child’s case and are mandated by the State of California as part of the Core Practice Model.

Child and Family Team Meetings are group meetings in which life-decisions about a foster child are discussed and made. These meetings are attended by the foster child, and typically their resource parent, their Trinity social worker, county social worker, family and community members, and service providers. There, foster children get a voice and a choice in the things that matter to them. These meetings are held with the idea that families and children are experts on themselves and have the ability to address their problems and achieve success in a strengths-based setting.

Trinity Youth Services firmly believes in each child having the ability to safely and genuinely express their needs and we are in full support of Child and Family Team Meetings. We believe it is vital to the health of a foster child and their family that their preferences are heard and are part of the decision-making process.

To learn more about our programs, click here and keep an eye out for our upcoming blog posts.


Jacqueline Jakob copyJackie Jakob, Foster Care and Adoptions Director
Having over 20 years’ experience, Jackie currently oversees Trinity Youth Services’ operations of foster care and adoptions programs throughout Southern California and in Houston, Texas. She received a bachelor’s degree in law and society from University of California Santa Barbara, a master’s degree in social work from California State University Long Beach and recently became a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Jackie enjoys spending time with her husband and two children attending various baseball, softball and judo meets. She is on the parent board for a judo dojo and is one of the troop leaders for her daughter’s Girl Scout troop. Additionally, she really enjoys running half marathons and aims to run 4 to 5 races each year.
Tel: 909.825.5588 | Email: info@trinityys.org

transition-to-adulthood

The Continuum of Care Reform (CCR) was designed so that children living out of their home would be provided the most appropriate placement in committed nurturing resource (foster) homes. Services and supports will be tailored based on each child’s needs. All of these services and supports fall into 6 Core Services: mental health, transition support upon entry, educational/physical/behavioral/extracurricular support, transition to adulthood support, permanency support, and Native American child services.

The Trinity Youth Services (TYS) team, along with our resource (foster) families, will directly provide the core services and support to children, Non-Minor Dependents (NMD) and their families, fulfilling the requirements of the CCR.

Last month we outlined the third core services, educational/physical/behavioral/extracurricular supports. This month we will look at transition to adulthood support.

This core service is critical to our older youth in care. Think back to when you were 18.  Were you ready to live on your own with no support whatsoever?  Extended foster care changed policies so that youth could stay in foster care through the age of 21 years old, allowing four more years of preparation time for the youth to be successful as adults. During this extended time in foster care, the NMDs must meet certain criteria to remain eligible for services. For example, they must be in school or working.

TYS is committed to supporting children and Non-Minor Dependents in achieving a successful adulthood. A huge part of this support comes from resource families opening their homes to teens and making them part of the family. Treatment Foster Care Social Workers (TFCSWs) along with the resource parents work closely together to provide educational and employment support to the youth by assisting in job search, support in completing job applications and providing the youth the opportunity to visit local colleges.

TFCSW will assist in the implementation of the Transitional Independent Living Plan (TILP) by working directly with the youth on achieving goals set within the plan. Youth will participate in independent living skills groups. Additionally, TYS will assist youth in establishing lifelong connections by assisting the youth find and connect with family and/or nonrelated family members.

In my next blog, I will discuss permanency support. This topic dives into the important support offered to TYS youth as the agency and families strive to achieve a permanent environment for children in foster care, either through reunification or adoption.


Jacqueline Jakob copyJackie Jakob, Foster Care and Adoptions Director
Having over 20 years’ experience, Jackie currently oversees Trinity Youth Services’ operations of foster care and adoptions programs throughout Southern California and in Houston, Texas. She received a bachelor’s degree in law and society from University of California Santa Barbara, a master’s degree in social work from California State University Long Beach and recently became a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Jackie enjoys spending time with her husband and two children attending various baseball, softball and judo meets. She is on the parent board for a judo dojo and is one of the troop leaders for her daughter’s Girl Scout troop. Additionally, she really enjoys running half marathons and aims to run 4 to 5 races each year.
Tel: 909.825.5588 | Email: info@trinityys.org


 

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